Thursday, June 18, 2009

Insh'Allah, Iran Will Be Free: I AM AN IRANIAN!

When I think back to just after 9/11, two images stand out in my memory of world reaction. First, I remember the Palestinian woman giving out candy in celebration of the atrocity. The other image I remember was of the Iranian people holding candlelight vigils in honor of the victims. Neither image was widely publicized in the US media, but I remember the rage, and awe that they inspired in me. I mention them today, as a preface to my analysis/opinion of current Middle Eastern events.


The brutal Iranian Mullahs accuse the US of "intolerable" interference in their election, the day after Pres. Obama said that he didn't want to be accused of interfering. Meanwhile, their Hamas puppets are allied with Al Queda in Palestinian Gaza. (link-Worldfocus.org) Can we all get on the same page, now? I understand the President is trying to "extend an open hand" to the Mullahs, but they have clearly slapped it away. This isn't about international politics; it's about freedom vs. oppression, or more basically, right vs. wrong.


Too many in the free world are afraid to pass such judgements, and therein lies our greatest flaw. It is not "biased" to call the Iranian leadership part of an "Axis of Evil," as Pres. Bush labeled them, if it is the truth. The Khomenist regime has shown itself to be as much to it's own citizens, and they are fighting back, with dignity and passion. The familiar cry "Allahu Akhbar," long associated with terrorist suicide bombers, takes on a new meaning when it is shouted across Iran from rooftops all through the night. God IS great, and there shouldn't be any stigma attached to shouting it out loud.


What's happening in Iran is a revolution, beyond a doubt. It should be embraced by all freedom-loving people in the world, especially those in the greater Middle East, where freedom carries a high price. It has been reported that some of the high-level Mullahs are supporting the protesters, as are as some of the Revolutionary Guard commanders, who are refusing to shoot the non-violent protesters. The government-supported militias have been the main force behind the crackdown, but they are creating more opposition to the Ahmedinejad supporters in the government.


Iran is a complex nation, with a population that is much more politically sophisticated than most Western people realize. Thanks to modern technology, we are getting a glimpse of this. The protesters are from all groups and classes of Iranians, and it's the recognition of this fact that has caused the Grand Ayatollah to order a "partial recount." This is an unprecedented action in a theocracy that calls election results "ordained by God." In this case, it seems more clear every day that the election results were "ordained by men," and the protesters are the ones "ordained by God."


I make no predictions of how this will all turn out, and indeed Henry Kissinger said he thinks Ahmedinejad's forces will triumph, on Greta Van Susteren's show Wed. night. However, John Bolton makes a case that Mousavi has, and would continue to support terrorism abroad and nuclear weapons, were he to assume Iran's presidency. (link-Fox News.com) Both of these men know far more than I do about Iran, so I defer to their judgements on these things. I can only speak my own opinion, and my heart is with those people in the streets, as their hearts were with us after 9/11. As JFK once said about the people of Berlin, I say today "I am an Iranian."